Home / Montreal / Lachine Wharf

Lachine Wharf

/
/
img

by Dick Nieuwendyk – mtltimes.ca

 

In the early 1900s, specially during the summer days, the Lachine Wharf was a scene of bustling activity, a favorite meeting place for locals and visitors alike.

 

"Canadian Empress" (St. Laurent Cruise Lines) at the Lachine lighthouse pier during a 7-day 6-night Montreal-Kingston Cruise in  2011   (Photo: Dick Nieuwendyk)
“Canadian Empress” (St. Laurent Cruise Lines) at the Lachine lighthouse pier during a 7-day 6-night Montreal-Kingston Cruise in 2011 (Photo: Dick Nieuwendyk)

At that time, the nearby Lachine Wharf Station of the Canadian National Railways was a terminal for both trains and riverboats. Every day, the Grand Trunk ran a  train  between  Montreal  and  the  Lachine  Wharf where many of the passengers, traveling  to  Ottawa, would  board  big side wheel steamers, such  as  the  Empress, the  Sovereign, or  the

Duchess of  York, owned and operated by the Ottawa River Navigation Co.   Others  would  travel  to  Toronto  aboard  the  Corsican, operated by the Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Company. Often, people traveled by electric trolley cars, which ran every half hour from Montreal to the Lachine Wharf,  to take a thrilling boat trip through the Rapids, which lie between Lachine and the city. The Lachine Rapids are the most perilous in the channel of the St. Lawrence, for dangerous rocks which lie just below the surface would deceive any but a skilful pilot.  Navigating  his  boat  through  the  rushing  waters certainly demanded all of his energies, and the words of this hymn come to mind…

“Steady, O Pilot, stand firm at the wheel.”

 

The heyday of steamboating came to an end about 1912, and even though many boats struggled on for a few years, the depression of the early thirties put an end to this part of Canadian transportation history.

 

The Lachine Wharf Station of the CNR became a freight depot, mostly for goods that were transported from and to the Dawes Brewery, which was located nearby on St. Joseph street. When the brewery became part of National Breweries and moved to Montreal, the station, which was once the most active one operated west of Montreal by the Grand Trunk System lost importance, and closed in 1934.

 

Today, the Lachine Wharf is mostly a parking lot where people watch the comings and goings of pleasure boats, kayaks, sailboats, and an occasional river cruise ship. In the early 1900s, specially during the summer days, the Lachine Wharf was a scene of bustling activity, a favorite meeting place for locals and visitors alike.

Picture on top : Paddle steamer “Duchess of York” at the Lachine Pier – 1910   (Built 1895 – Scrapped 1943)
Source: Collections Canada / The Gazette1934

Claim a Free Spins No Deposit Bonus and begin your gambling adventure with a win! Casinobonusca.com has a huge collection of promotions ready for you. Check them out and start playing!

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar
Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views :