Home / Life / Mother’s Day: Give Mom the Gift of a Good Book

Mother’s Day: Give Mom the Gift of a Good Book

/
/
img

By Jillian Clark –mtltimes.ca

I think that books are great gifts. Not only are they a tangible item, but they are easily wrapped and double as an experience to enjoy. Books allow us to escape from reality in the time we spend between the pages. Books can be mini vacations, stories to share, and lessons to learn together. With Mother’s Day just around the corner, I’ve compiled a list of books all of our moms might enjoy this spring.

“Very Good Lives” J.K. Rowling

Our favourite author strikes again, promising to pull at our heart strings in a much different way than Harry Potter ever did. This series of essays is accessible to anyone at a life turning point. Rowling draws from experience to explore both failure and wellbeing.redeye-jkrowling-very-good-lives-review-20150414

Some of us grew up reading J.K. Rowling with mom, so gifting Rowling’s “Very Good Lives” may seem like the appropriate next book to bond over.

“Letter To My Daughter” Maya Angelou

Follow Maya Angelou’s road to wellbeing through a series of essays written to a daughter she never had. Maya tells her story into motherhood, remembering lessons of compassion along the way. Heartbreak and inspiration rolled between two covers.Letter to my daughter

“Wild” Cheryl Strayed

There’s a reason why this story recently hit the big screens. Cheryl Strayed’s memoire begins when her mother passes away, kick starting her loss of self and looming collapse. Strayed embarks on The Pacific Crest Trail, and simultaneously embarks on a trail to find herself. This story exemplifies that we can only find the deepest compassion when we have travelled through the deepest hells. Strayed shows us snapshots of her mother throughout her hike, painting a picture of their relationship.

Even if you already caught the movie together, we all know that books are always better.

“The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency” Alexander McCall Smith

Mma Precious Ramotswe, opens up her own detective agency in Gaborone, Botswana. As the only female detective in Gaborone, she just wants to “help people with the problems of their lives.” Her stories explore relationships, traditional occupations of women, feminism, morals and ethics. Her detective work makes you laugh and cry. The chapters are short and perfect for sharing, but the stories are endless as you indulge in this lengthy series!

“The Day We Met: A Novel” Rowan Coleman

Explore a sneak peek into the mind of a loving mother, wife and daughter. Protagonist Claire is overwhelmed by emotions towards her mother, twenty-year-old daughter, long-time husband and three-year-old. Her husband buys her a blank book, in which Claire starts writing all of her thoughts, memories, and emotions towards her family, in a desperate search for clarity. Claire’s worst fear is to forget how she met her husband, and where she fits in her own life.

The Day we met

Bond with your mom over the relatable story of Claire and her family.

“The Oh She Glows Cookbook” Angela Liddon

I don’t know about your mom, but my mother has become pretty adventurous in her cooking recently. So much so, that she may even enjoy the cookbook that vegans everywhere have been gushing over. Even if you’re not vegan, this book is full of great ideas that also adapt to become gluten free. Each recipe is framed around healthy eating and wellbeing. And, if you give your mom a cookbook, you’ll both benefit when she starts baking!

“Beloved” Toni Morrison

Much more gruesome, yet gripping, than the other options. Toni Morrison tells the story of a mother – Sethe – in slavery who kills her daughter to save her from a similar life. After escaping slavery, Sethe believes that the daughter she murdered has come back to haunt her. This horror explores maternal bonds, passion, and her surviving daughter’s relationship with the rest of the community.toni-morrison-beloved

“Pride and Prejudice” Jane Austen

In terms of classics, Pride and Prejudice has the most memorable mother figure. All that Mrs. Bennet wants is for her five daughters to behave and marry wealthy men – is that so much to ask? Mrs. Bennet’s embarrassing characteristics provide comic relief to the story, and showcase Austen’s thoughts on women and marriage.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar
Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views :
%d bloggers like this: